Training Programs

Pick the right track for you:

Aerowood Aviation offers flight training programs for Sport and Private Certifications as well as Instrument Ratings.

We recommend and offer pilot training kits containing everything needed to study and achieve your piloting goals.

We offer a self-paced, syllabus guided program and also accelerated, or finish-up programs.

Sport Pilot

20 hours of training per FAR 61.311, sport pilot test, logbook sign-offs, practical test.

1) Be at least 17 years of age.

2) Be able to read, write and converse fluently in English.

3) Hold either a current and valid U.S. driver’s license or a current FAA medical certificate.

4) Receive and log ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course which subjects include:

FARs

NTSB Part 830

Use of AIM and ACs

Use of VFR charts

Aviation weather

Operation of aircraft

Airplane performance

Weight and balance

Aerodynamics and systems

Stall/spin awareness

Aeronautical decision making (ADM)

Required preflight actions

5) Pass the FAA sport pilot knowledge test with a score of 70% or better.

6) Accumulate flight experience (FAR 61.311). Receive a total of 20 hours of flight training and solo flight time, including:

15 hours of flight training from a certified flight instructor (CFI) including at least:

2 hours of cross-country, i.e., to other airports

10 takeoffs and landing to a full stop at an airport

3 hours of flight training, preparing for the practical test within 60 days before the test, on those areas specified in FAR 61.311

5 hours of solo flight training in those areas specified in FAR 61.311, including 1 solo cross-country flight of at least 75 NM total distance, with a full-stop landing at a minimum of two points and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 25 NM between the takeoff and landing locations.

7) Receive flight instruction and demonstrate skill (FAR 61.311). Obtain a logbook sign-off from your CFI on the following areas of operation:

Preflight preparation

Preflight procedures

Airport operations

Takeoffs, landings and go-arounds

Performance maneuvers

Ground reference maneuvers

Navigation

Slow flight and stalls

Emergency operations

Post-flight procedures

8) Successfully complete a practical test.

9) Advantages: Lower costs, no medical certificate requirement, faster to complete.

10) Disadvantages: Limited to sport airplanes, no night flight allowed, only one passenger allowed, restrictions of type of airspace and airports you can operate in, no operations above 10,000 ft., no instrument flight.

11) Alternative: Obtain a private pilot certificate.

Private Pilot

40 hours of training per FAR 61.109, private pilot test, logbook sign-offs, practical test.

1) Be at least 17 years of age.

2) Be able to read, write, and converse fluently in English.

3) Hold a current FAA medical certificate.

4) Receive and log ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course. Subjects include:

FARs

NTSB Part 830

Use of AIM and ACs

Use of VFR charts

Radio communication

Aviation weather

Operation of aircraft

Airplane performance

Weight and balance

Aerodynamics and systems

Stall/spin awareness

Aeronautical decision making (ADM)

Required preflight actions

5) Pass the FAA private pilot knowledge test with a score of 70% or better. Aerowood offers ground school courses to complete this knowledge test with classes at our facilities.

6) Accumulate flight experience (FAR 61.109). Receive a total of 40 hours of flight training and solo flight time, including:

20 hours of flight training from a certified flight instructor (CFI), including at least:

3 hours of cross-country, i.e., to other airports

3 hours at night including one cross-country flight of over 100 NM total distance,

10 takeoffs and landings to a full stop at an airport

3 hours of training to control and maneuver an airplane solely by reference to instruments

3 hours in a single-engine airplane in preparation for the private pilot practical test within 60 days prior to that test

10 hours of solo flight time in an airplane, including at least:

5 hours of cross-country time

One solo cross-country flight of at least 150 NM total distance, with full-stop landings at a minimum of three points and with one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 50 NM between the takeoff and landing locations.

Three solo takeoffs and landings to a full stop at an airport with an operating control tower.

7) Receive flight instruction and demonstrate skill (FAR 61.107). Obtain a logbook sign-off by your CFI on the following areas of operation:

Preflight preparation

Preflight procedures

Airport operations

Takeoffs, landing and go-arounds

Performance maneuvers

Ground reference maneuvers

Navigation

Slow flight and stalls

Basic instrument maneuvers

Emergency operations

Night operations

Post-flight procedures

8) Successfully complete a practical test.

Instrument Rating

50 hours cross-country pilot-in-command, 40 hours actual or simulated instrument time, instrument rating knowledge test, logbook sign-offs, practical test.

1) Hold at least a private pilot certificate

2) Be able to read, write, and converse fluently in English.

3) Hold a current FAA medical certificate.

4) Receive and log ground training from an authorized instructor or complete a home-study course. Subjects include:

FARs

IFR-related items in the AIM

ATC system and procedures

IFR navigation

Use of IFR charts

Aviation weather

Operating under IFR

Recognition of critical weather

Aeronautical decision making (ADM)

Crew resource management (CRM)

5) Pass the FAA instrument rating knowledge test with a score of 70% or better.

6) Accumulate flight experience (FAR 61.65).

50 hours of cross-country time as a student pilot, which is logged as pilot-in-command time.

Each cross-country must have a landing at an airport that was at least a straight-line distance of more than 50 NM from the original departure point.

A total of 40 hours of actual or simulated instrument time in the areas of operation listed in item 7 below, including:

15 hours of instrument flight training from a CFII

3 hours of instrument training from a CFII in preparation for the practical test within 60 days preceding the practical test.

Cross-country flight procedures that include at least one cross-country flight in an airplane that is performed under IFR and consists of:

A distance of at least 250 NM along airways or ATC-directed routing

An instrument approach at each airport

Three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.

If the instrument training was provided by an authorized instructor, a maximum of 20 hours is permitted in an approved flight simulator or flight training device.

7) Receive flight instruction and demonstrate skill (FAR 61.65). Obtain a logbook sign-off by your CFII on the following areas of operation:

Preflight preparation

Preflight procedures

Air traffic control clearance and procedures

Flight by reference to instruments

Navigation systems

Instrument approach procedures

Emergency operations

Post-flight procedures

8) Successfully complete a practical test.